nature photography

Arches of the Parisian markethalls at the entrance of the WH Vliegenbos

The W.H. Vliegenforest, oldest city forest of Amsterdam – with a touch of Paris


Deze blog post in het Nederlands (link)

The W.H. Vliegenbos (W.H. Vliegenforest) in Amsterdam North is the oldest city forest of the city council of Amsterdam. It was created between 1910 and 1918 on the initiative of the socialist councillor W.H.Vliegen, who wanted a forest close to Amsterdam for the workers to be able to go for a walk and enjoy nature.

While the forest has some park-like elements, with an asphalted path and some benches and nice water features, for the largest part (about 15 ha) it is forest, existing of dry and wet Ash-Elms woods. Next to ash trees and elms it also has many poplars and maples, a great variation in structure, and a large diversity of trees, bushes and undergrowth . The remarkable high number of Elms in this forest is due to the very strict policies the city of Amsterdam observes with regard to the Elms disease. Because of this, the W.H. Vliegenbos is the largest still existing Elms-rich forest of the Netherlands, and maybe even of Western Europe.

At the entrance of the Vliegenforest, some large cast-iron arches draw the attention. These arches originate from the old Parisian Market halls, that were demolished in 1971. The Amsterdam artist Peter Diem purchased some of those arches, and donated them to the city council. They were restored and now serve as a remarkable entrance to this city forest.

– All these photo’s were made during the first test-photoshoot with the rented Canon EOS 7D camera (see my previous blog post) –

Source: Nl.Wikipedia, Dichtbij.nl , Knbv.nl , En.Wikipedia ,

Arches of the Parisian markethalls at the entrance of the WH Vliegenbos

Arches of the Parisian fish market halls at the entrance of the WH Vliegenbos, Amsterdam North

Detail of the Parisian arches, donated by the Amsterdam artist Peter Diem

Detail of the Parisian arches, donated by the Amsterdam artist Peter Diem

Some wet benches along the path in the autumn park-like forest

Some wood logs turned into benches along the path in the autumn park-like forest.

Nice water features reflect the colours of fall

Nice water features reflect the colours of fall

Advertisements

Two Grey crowned cranes with golden crown


Deze blog post in het Nederlands (link)

Two grey crowned cranes with golden crown

Two grey crowned cranes with golden crown

Photo made in ‘de Oliemeulen’ zoo in Tilburg, the Netherlands – Sept. 22, 2014

Grey crowned cranes (Balearica regulorum) are native to the dry savannah in Africa south of the Sahara, although it nests in somewhat wetter habitats. They can also be found in marshes, cultivated lands and grassy flatlands near rivers and lakes in eastern from the Uganda and Kenya, south to South Africa. This animal does not migrate.

The grey crowned crane has a breeding display involving dancing, bowing, and jumping. It has a booming call which involves inflation of the red gular sac. It also makes a honking sound quite different from the trumpeting of other crane species.

These cranes are omnivores, eating plants, seeds, grain, insects, frogs, worms, snakes, small fish and the eggs of aquatic animals. Stamping their feet as they walk, they flush out insects which are quickly caught and eaten. The birds also associate with grazing herbivores, benefiting from the ability to grab prey items disturbed by antelopes and gazelles. They spend their entire day looking for food. At night, the crowned crane spends it time in the trees sleeping and resting.

The grey crowned crane is the national bird of Uganda and features in the country’s flag and coat of arms.

Although the grey crowned crane remains common over much of its range, it faces threats to its habitat due to drainage, overgrazing, and pesticide pollution. In 2012 it was uplisted from vulnerable to endangered by the IUCN.” Source: Wikipedia

Young Eglantine Rose on thorny bush


Deze blogpost in het Nederlands (link)

Young Eglantine Rose on thorny bush

Young Eglantine Rose on thorny bush

Young, soft pink Eglantine rose with yellow stamens and tiny drops of dew on the petals, on an old and thorny bush… Photo made in North Holland Dunes Reserve, June 8, 2014.

The choice for this image to post today was inspired by a poem of georgetteann  : Grief – May this image bring some gentle comfort and hope to anyone who has lost a loved one recently or longer ago – and still silently cries at night about the loss…

Snowy Owl


Bekijk mijn parallel blog in het NEDERLANDS

This Snowy Owl was photographed in Pairi Daiza zoo, a marvellous themed zoo on the grounds of a previous abbey in Brugelette, Belgium.

The Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) is a large owl, typically found in the northern circumpolar region, where it makes its summer home north of latitude 60 degrees north. However, it is a particularly nomadic bird, and because population fluctuations in its prey species can force it to relocate, it has been known to breed at more southerly latitudes. (source: Wikipedia )

Snowy Owl - a penny for your thoughts

Snowy Owl – a penny for your thoughts

Snowy Owl - Wize wizzard

Snowy Owl – Wize wizzard