nature

On a grey morning in autumn...

Trees on the Heath on a grey autumn morning


Nederlands

Today I went for the second time this week to Bussum. I already went a first time on last Sunday morning early, in the hope to catch the first light of sunrise. Sadly, there wasn’t any visible sunrise then – instead, it rained from the moment I left home, and never stopped raining till I came back four hours later, soaking wet! I hiked for about three hours, exploring the Westerheide, a part of the Goois Nature Reserve where I had never been before. But I didn’t even take my rented camera out of my bag, since I didn’t want to take the risk to damage it.

So this morning, I wanted to try my luck again. I know the Goois Nature reserve is at it’s best during Autumn season – especially since the area has a great variety of fungi. And I wanted to photograph at dawn the part of the heath were I saw those marvellous trees day before yesterday… But again, it was very clouded today, so no sign of a sunrise whatsoever. But at least it didn’t rain. So I did manage to make some great pics of the trees I had seen during my scouting of last Sunday. However, half way through the morning, I must have messed up something with the settings of the camera – I don’t know exactly what I did, but at a certain moment the shutter got a delay of about 12” , and I couldn’t find how to set it back to normal. That’s what can happen when you try out a new camera LOL. So well, that was it, time to go back home anyway… I hope the mushrooms will still be there next time I go… with my own camera then! And the trees, hope you enjoy them as much as I did! 😀

Lonely oak on the Heath.

Lonely oak on the heath.

They can see each other, but they'll never meet...

They can see each other, but they’ll never meet…

On a grey morning in autumn...

On a grey morning in autumn…

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Fall = mushrooms time


Deze blogpost in het Nederlands (link).

 

Fall is really the ideal time to make pics of mushrooms in all colours and shapes. This year, I haven’t had much occasion yet to go out into the woods, but last year I did. So, in the hope of having an occasion soon to go for a hike with my camera to make some new fall images, here are a few of the mushrooms I made in Nature reserve the Osbroek in Aalst, Belgium – October 4, 2013

 

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Red-legged seriema on the pathway


Deze blog post in het Nederlands (link)

Red-legged seriema on the pathway

Red-legged seriema on the pathway

Also named crested cariama

Eyes of a sleepy white wolf


Deze blog post in het Nederlands (link)

Eyes of a sleepy white wolf

Eyes of a sleepy white wolf

Photo made in Artis Amsterdam zoo,  October 28, 2014

Beautiful succulent flower - collage

Beautiful succulent flower – collage


Deze blogpost in het Nederlands (link).

I was visiting a friend this week, and she showed me the amazing flower she got on a little succulent plant on her window sill. What a stunning flower in a deep red colour, and all covered with soft little hairs… I never saw something like this! I happened to have my camera with me, so asked her whether I could make some pictures. Of course that was fine with her.  We had to improvise a bit with the placement and lighting, since there was little light inside. And I would have wished that the plant was in a nicer pot… But I was quite happy with the result anyway.
Today I decided to make some of the images into a collage and card-design…   Maybe I’ll do some more photoshopping on it later on. Hope you like it 😉

 

Beautiful succulent flower - collage

Beautiful succulent flower – collage

Morning Poetry – Canadean goose on the river Rurh


Deze blog post in het Nederlands (link)

Morning poetry - Canadian goose on the River Ruhr

Morning poetry – Canadian goose on the River Ruhr

Photo made in Germany, Essen, North Rhine-Westphalia – May 2014

Two Grey crowned cranes with golden crown


Deze blog post in het Nederlands (link)

Two grey crowned cranes with golden crown

Two grey crowned cranes with golden crown

Photo made in ‘de Oliemeulen’ zoo in Tilburg, the Netherlands – Sept. 22, 2014

Grey crowned cranes (Balearica regulorum) are native to the dry savannah in Africa south of the Sahara, although it nests in somewhat wetter habitats. They can also be found in marshes, cultivated lands and grassy flatlands near rivers and lakes in eastern from the Uganda and Kenya, south to South Africa. This animal does not migrate.

The grey crowned crane has a breeding display involving dancing, bowing, and jumping. It has a booming call which involves inflation of the red gular sac. It also makes a honking sound quite different from the trumpeting of other crane species.

These cranes are omnivores, eating plants, seeds, grain, insects, frogs, worms, snakes, small fish and the eggs of aquatic animals. Stamping their feet as they walk, they flush out insects which are quickly caught and eaten. The birds also associate with grazing herbivores, benefiting from the ability to grab prey items disturbed by antelopes and gazelles. They spend their entire day looking for food. At night, the crowned crane spends it time in the trees sleeping and resting.

The grey crowned crane is the national bird of Uganda and features in the country’s flag and coat of arms.

Although the grey crowned crane remains common over much of its range, it faces threats to its habitat due to drainage, overgrazing, and pesticide pollution. In 2012 it was uplisted from vulnerable to endangered by the IUCN.” Source: Wikipedia

Young Eglantine Rose on thorny bush


Deze blogpost in het Nederlands (link)

Young Eglantine Rose on thorny bush

Young Eglantine Rose on thorny bush

Young, soft pink Eglantine rose with yellow stamens and tiny drops of dew on the petals, on an old and thorny bush… Photo made in North Holland Dunes Reserve, June 8, 2014.

The choice for this image to post today was inspired by a poem of georgetteann  : Grief – May this image bring some gentle comfort and hope to anyone who has lost a loved one recently or longer ago – and still silently cries at night about the loss…

Tube dwelling anemones, wonderful creatures of the sea


Deze blogpost in het Nederlands (link)

Today, I would like to show you one of my recent nature photographs. Let’s make Wednesday the #WonderfulNature day 😉

Sea Anemones, wonderful creatures of the sea

Sea Anemones, wonderful creatures of the sea

Photo of two tube dwelling anemones, a blue and a pink one, photographed in the Aquarium of Artis Amsterdam zoo, the Netherlands (August 31, 2014)

Tube-dwelling anemones or cerianthids look very similar to sea anemones, but belong to an entirely different subclass of anthozoans. They are solitary, living buried in soft sediments. Tube anemones live and can withdraw into tubes, which are made of a fibrous material, which is made from secreted mucus and threads of nematocyst-like organelles, known as ptychocysts.

Cerianthids have a crown of tentacles that consists of two whorls of distinctly different sized tentacles. The outer whorl consists of large tentacles that extend outwards. These tentacles taper to points and are mostly used in food capture and defence. The smaller inner tentacles are held more erect than the larger lateral tentacles and are used for food manipulation and ingestion.” Source: Wikipedia

Give me one too…


Family, mom dad and kids, with red bicycles eating salted chips - Amsterdam Street photography

Give me one too

‘Streets of Amsterdam’-series

Family, mom, dad and kids, with rented red Mac Bike bicycles, in the busy touristic centre of Amsterdam. The boy and girl in front of the carrier bicycle eating salted chips, and sharing some with dad – Amsterdam Street photography